Yr 13 Curriculum

The Fine Art & Photography courses aim to develop the practice, enjoyment and understanding of contemporary art, photography and lens-based media. The course engages students’ experience through artistic and educational programmes that are distinctive, innovative and challenging.

 

Students have the opportunity to work with arts and educational practioners to ensure that they have a deep and wide-ranging engagement with contemporary art & photography, artist moving image and digital media practice resulting in exhibitions in both physical and virtual spaces.

 

The creation of a personal approach to creating images is essential for success, thus improving confidence in use of variety of mediums that encourages breadth and depth in the development of students’ visual language. Students have opportunities to generate ideas and research from primary and contextual sources, record their findings, experiment with media and processes and develop and refine their ideas towards producing a portfolio of evidence for final assessment in May.

 

Qualification

Level

Duration

Units

Credits

Equivalent

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Business

3

2 Years

6

60

1 A-Level

BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Business

3

2 Years

12

120

2 A-Levels

 

What will I Study?

Qualification

Year

Unit No

Unit Title

Credits

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Business

2

3

16

9

Introduction to Marketing

Human Resource Management

Creative product promotion

 

10

10

10

BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Business

 

2

10

12 

18

Market Research in Business

Internet marketing 

Managing a Business event

10

10

10

 

How will I be assessed?

All of the units studied will be internally assessed. There are no external examinations. All assessment for BTEC First qualifications is criterion referenced, based on the achievement of all the specified learning outcomes.

Each unit within the qualification has specified assessment and grading criteria which are to be used for grading purposes. A summative unit grade can be awarded at pass, merit or distinction:

To achieve a ‘pass’ a learner must have satisfied all the pass criteria

To achieve a ‘merit’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the merit criteria

To achieve a ‘distinction’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the distinction criteria.

A grading scale of pass, merit and distinction is applied to all units.

During the course you will undertake a variety of different assessment methods, these could include; practical work alongside witness statements, written reports, presentations, designing different publications such as posters, leaflets or booklets.

When an assignment is set you will receive an assignment brief.

What could I do next?

You will have gained enough knowledge of the business industry from a variety of different functions to seek employment in the area that interests you most.

You can progress to further education and complete a degree in a variety of business subjects.

In Level 3 NQF in Child’s Play, Learning and Development our students go out on work experience one afternoon or morning a week. We pick local nurseries, primary schools and The Children’s Centre. Here is yet another opportunity to put classroom learning into context by allowing them an insight into the real world. Student love this time away from school and it is often an experience that can define their future careers and university choices.

BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Dance

The sixth form dance course is a BTEC level 3 120 credit diploma in dance. Students study 12 different units across two years in which they create, perform and appreciate a variety of dance styles for camera and for live performances. Students are assessed on physical skills and performance skills through different stylistic qualities both in class and assessments. Students are also marked on their commitment to the course and their final assessments. The majority of assessments will take place during the school dance show in April.

Drama offers skills that employers have recognised as being crucial in a variety of job roles such as: Front of House e.g. box office, ushers, runner, lighting and sound technicians and designer, script writer, arts consultant, director, game designer (fastest developing industry), set designer, TV editor, TV presenter, make-up artist, costume designer, actor, producer, cinematographer, theatre company artist, radio broadcaster and producer, drama therapist.

Component 1: Devising (40%)

Coursework

Component 2: Text in Performance (20%)

Coursework

Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice (40%)

Written Exam

Performances:

  • Devise an original performance
  • Use one key extract from a performance text
  • Apply the work of a practitioner
  • Performer and design routes available

 

Portfolio – You will document the creative process:

  • Rehearsals
  • Workshops
  • Developing your role
  • Evaluate your contribution to the piece

Performances:

  • You participate in a group performance of extract from a play
  • You will perform a monologue/duologue performance

 

Exploration:

  • You will study a practitioner and explore a full play focusing on one extract for performance.

 

Performance Intentions: A brief outline of your role and the plot of the play

  • Who role are you playing?
  • What is happening to your character? In the extract?
  • Character objectives, motivations and feelings.

Section A: Live Theatre Evaluation of a performance we have watched and studied as a class. 

  • You will answer one extended question from a choice of two. You will analyse and evaluate the live theatre performance.
  • You are allowed to bring in theatre evaluation notes of up to a maximum of 500 words.

 

Section B: Page to Stage: Realising a Performance Text 

  • You will answer two extended questions on your interpretation and of an extract from the play.
  • You answer from the point of view as a performer and designer.

 

Section C: Interpreting a Performance Text

  • Answer one question based on a set text
  • You are the director the production and discussing how you would stage the play extract

 

Theatre Pass Scheme: As a school we are committed to ensuring that our Drama students have the opportunity to watch a range of live performances as part of their Drama training. The Theatre pass enables students to see more performances at a highly subsidised price. Our A-level students will be travelling to London to see one of their set texts at the National Theatre later in the academic year.

Higher Education Courses: You have the option to go on and study at degree level in a number of universities developing as a professional and gaining one of many jobs in the creative sector. OR you could study at a prestigious Drama school and peruse an acting, film and media career. 

Extra Opportunities

  • LAMDA grades
  • Shakespeare Schools Festival
  • National Theatre Connections
  • National Youth Theatre Auditions

A-level English Literature

This course encourages   learners to develop their interest in and  enjoyment of literature  and literary studies by reading widely and independently. It is important to engage critically and creatively to texts as well as exploring different interpretations of them.

Students will have the opportunity to study Shakespeare’s ‘Twelfth Night’ by analysing the text close detail and exploring the use of dramatic effects. Learners will consider issues raised in the play and consider how different audiences may interpret the language over time.                 

Additionally, students will study Christina Rossetti’s poetry and John Webster’s ‘The Duchess of Malfi’. Learners are required to explore     contrasts, connections and comparisons between these literary        texts. They will also explore the  significance of cultural and contextual influences on the readers and writers.

Another element of the course is exploring the Gothic genre. Students will demonstrate close reading skills in analysing Angela Carter’s ‘The Bloody Chamber’ as well as Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’. They will also have to analyse an unseen prose extracts and consider how it is typical of the Gothic genre.

Students will be required to communicate fluently and accurately when they choose to either produce a close reading analysis piece or a re-creative writing piece with commentary for the coursework element of this course.

 

A-level English Language 

The A Level in English Language introduces learners to the concepts and methods of English language. Learners develop an ability to analyse a wide range of spoken and written forms of English, including electronic and multi-modal forms. Learners will develop contextual and theoretical knowledge and understanding through their course of study. Learners will develop a broad knowledge and understanding of the language levels, including: 

  • Phonetics, phonology and prosodics: how speech sounds and effects are articulated and analysed
  • Lexis and semantics: the vocabulary of English, including social and historical variation
  • Grammar including morphology: the structural patterns and shapes of English at sentence, clause, phrase and word level
  • Pragmatics: the contextual aspects of language use
  • Discourse: extended stretches of communication occurring in different genres, modes and contexts.

This course requires learners to apply language concepts and methods of analysis appropriately and systematically to data.

Learners will apply critical and creative skills in close reading, description, evaluation, analysis, interpretation, and production of texts and discourses as well as accurately using a range of terminology associated with the study of language.

Making accurate references to texts and sources is also a requirement. The term ‘data’ in the context of this specification refers to any source of English language that can be analysed. This may mean written texts, multi-modal texts or transcriptions of speech. In the course of study this may also include speech or media sources which are experienced and explored without transcription. 

In addition, A level learners will be expected to critically evaluate attitudes towards language and its users and undertake independent investigations of language, selecting appropriate methods and techniques.

Learners will also synthesise and reflect on language knowledge and understanding drawn from different areas of their studies. 

Exploring language (Component 01) offers learners the opportunity to develop their ability to apply the analytical tools to texts in varying modes, as well as to engage with current debates around language use. 

Dimensions of linguistic variation (Component 02) explores language use in particular contexts across time and place.

Independent language research (Component 03) allows learners to pursue an independent language investigation, developing the skills most valued by Higher Education and employers.

Year 12 and 13 students are studying for Edexcel Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary and Level 3 Advanced Level GCE in history. This course explores revolutions in early modern and modern Europe. We follow ‘Route C: Revolutions in early modern and modern Europe’ and ‘Option 39.1: Civil rights and race relations in the USA, 1850-2009’.

The year 12 course is all about the causes of revolution. We ask questions such as: What inspires people to overthrow their leaders and demand change? How successful are revolutions? How much really changes? We investigate the role of individuals and life in different societies. The course involves a study of Britain 1625 – 1701 and Russia in revolution 1894 – 1925. Then in year 13 students undertake a stimulating and thought provoking exploration of the history of civil rights from slavery to Obama.  It includes an exploration of the role of film and literature in the campaign for equality. In year 13 pupils also complete coursework based on Russia in revolution, this helps them revise the topic in preparation for the year 13 exams. An enrichment programme allows pupils to revise Britain 1625-1701.

Year 13 examinations

 

Paper 1: Britain 1625 – 1701: conflict, revolution and settlement

2hrs 15 minutes (60 marks / 30% of qualification)

3 questions. Section A and B comprise a choice of essay questions. Section C is one compulsory interpretation based question.

 

Paper 2: Russia in revolution, 1894 – 1924

1hr 30 minutes (40 marks / 20% of qualification)

2 questions. Section A comprises one compulsory two part question and section B comprises a choice of essay questions.

 

Paper 3: Civil rights and race relations in the USA 1850 – 2009

2hrs 15 minutes (60 marks / 30% 0f the qualification)

3 questions. Section A is one compulsory source based question, section B and C require you to answer 1 question each from a choice of essays

Studying Philosophy and Ethics offers an insight into cultures, morality and beliefs from the world around us. If you find yourself thinking about the ultimate questions of the world, such as is there a God? Why is there evil in the world? What makes something good and bad? Is there a just war? Why do people hold certain beliefs? Then Philosophy and Ethics will have something to say to you.

Philosophy and Ethics enables you to understand and reflect upon ideas and concepts that are happening around you all of the time; encouraging you to question assumptions about the world, and find out what some of the great scholars of society have to say about it. Philosophy and Ethics allows us to question our own morality and beliefs and assess how the world can be improved and bettered.

Philosophy and Ethics can lead to a variety of careers. These include Journalism, the Legal Profession, Social Work, Teaching, Nursing, Marketing, Public Relations, Philosophical Enquiry, Civil Service, Market Research, the Police and even Politics to name but a few. For more information check out the 2008 Edexcel exam specification.

Second Year

Topics

Content/ Assessment

Developments

 

Focus of seven topics surrounding philosophical and ethical concepts:

Arguments for the existence of God: Ontological Argument, Argument from Religious Experience

Philosophical Issues: Atheistic Arguments, Religious Language

Ethical Theories: Virtue Ethics, Deontology

Critiques of religion and Morality

An assessed examination at the end of the year on three of the topics

Implications

 

Study of three philosophical text sources and applying the different AS and A2 content within.

Text 1: ‘God talk is evidently nonsense’ by AJ Ayer

Text 2: ‘Can we know God by experience?’ by Peter Donovan

Text 3: ‘The emergence of modern philosophy of Religion’ by Merold Westphal

An assessed examination focusing on one of the three texts

A Level Psychology First and Second Year AQA

Psychology will give you the opportunity to explore why people behave the way they do, with a focus on developing research, discussion, application, evaluative and analytical skills. By the end of the course you will have arguments to suggest why a variety of behaviours happen such as why Nazi soldiers obeyed orders to systematically kill 6 million Jews during World War Two; why people follow the crowd; why memories are influenced by leading questions; why we develop phobias. Finding answers too many intriguing questions makes Psychology the perfect choice for someone with an inquisitive mind. Psychology can lead to many different career paths ranging from Psychologist, Teacher, Child Care Practitioner, NHS worker, Police Officer and Marketing and Law based work plus much more! For more information check out the exam specification.

Year 1

Term Test Paper and Topic
(Research Methods is assessed independently in Paper 2 but also appears throughout all topics)
Assessment
1

Paper 1: Memory

Paper 1: Attachment

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
2

Paper 1: Social Influence

Paper 1: Psychopathology

Paper 2: Approaches

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
3

Paper 1: Psychopathology continued

Paper 2: Approaches continued

Paper 2: Revisit Research Methods from throughout course

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
End of Year Test
Summer research methods project Externally assessed paper end of Year 2

Year 2

Term Test Paper and Topic
(Research Methods is assessed independently in Paper 2 but also appears throughout all topics)
Assessment
1

Paper 2 Biopsychology

Paper 3 Issues and Debates

Paper 3 Schizophrenia

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
2

Paper 3 Relationships

Paper 3 Forensic Psychology

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
3

Paper 3 Relationships continued

Paper 3 Forensic Psychology continued

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
In the sixth form A Level Biology, Chemistry and Physics are offered along with Level 3 courses in BTEC Health and Social Care, and Applied Science.

A Level Sociology First and Second Year AQA

Studying Sociology offers an insight into the people and the world around us. If you find yourself thinking about why the world is the way it is, then sociology will have something to say to you. Sociology enables you to understand and reflect upon events that are going on around you all of the time; encouraging you to question common sense assumptions about the world, and find out what some of the great thinkers of society have to say about it. Sociology involves research and gathering evidence, to try and suggest ways that we could improve the society we live in. Sociology can lead to a variety of careers. These include Journalism, the Legal Profession, Social Work, Teaching, Nursing, Marketing, Public Relations, Social Research, Civil Service, Market Research, the Police and even Politics to name but a few. For more information check out the exam specification.

Year 1

Term Test Paper and Topic
(Research Methods is assessed independently in Paper 2 but also appears throughout all topics)
Assessment
1 Paper 1 Education with Theory and Methods

 

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
2 Paper 2 Topics in Sociology: Families and Households

 

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
3 Paper 1 and 2 review of content so far

Paper 1 and 3 Theory and Methods

 

Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
End of Year Test
Summer research methods project Externally assessed paper end of Year 2

Year 2

Term Test Paper and Topic
(Research Methods appears throughout all sections also)
Assessment
1  Paper 2 Topic in Sociology: Beliefs in Society Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
2 Paper 3 Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2
3 Paper 3 Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods continued Weekly homework
4 week topic test
Unit Mock Paper (Half Termly)
Externally assessed paper end of Year 2

By the end of year 13 students will be required to show understanding of a variety of authentic resources through listening and reading. They will be able to adapt their language skills appropriately for different situations and purposes. Students will use the language to present viewpoints, develop arguments, analyse and evaluate, in speech and writing and be expected to understand and apply the grammatical system and a range of structures asdetailed in the A level specification. They will cover the following topics:

A Level

(c) Environmental Issues, including technology, pollution, global warming, transport, energy, nuclear energy, renewable energies, conservation, recycling, sustainability.

(d) Social and Political Issues, including the role of the media, racism, immigration social exclusion and integration, terrorism, world of work (employment, commerce, globalization, etc.),

BTEC Sport

Qualification

Level

Duration

Units

Credits

Equivalent

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma in Sport

3

2 Years

7

60

1 A-Level

BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Sport.

3

2 Years

13

120

2 A-Levels

BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Sport

3

2 years

18

180

3 A – Levels

Edexcel BTEC nationals are QCF level-3 qualifications designed to provide highly specialist work-related qualifications in a range of vocational sectors. You will gain the knowledge, understanding and skills that you need to prepare for employment. The qualifications also provide career development opportunities if you are already in work, and provide progression opportunities within related areas of study at universities and other institutions.

 

What will I study?

Term

Unit No

Unit Title

Credits

Sub/Dip/Ext

1

7

9

22

Fitness testing for Sport and Exercise

Practical Individual Sport

Rules, Regulations and Officiating in Sport

10

10

10

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext Triple

2

1

2

11

13

Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport

The Physiology of Fitness

Sports Nutrition

Leadership in Sport

5

5

10

10

Sub Single

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext Triple

3

3

26

15

Assessing Risk in Sport

Work Experience in Sport

Instructing Physical Activity in Sport

10

10

10

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext Triple

Year 2

1

8

4

14

Practical Team Sports

Fitness Testing and Programming

Exercise, Health and Lifestyle

10

10

10

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext triple

2

6

12

16

Sports Development

Current Issues in Sport

Exercise for Specific Groups

10

10

10

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext Triple

3

18

5

23

Sports Injuries

Sports Coaching

Organising Sports Events

10

10

10

Sub Single

Dip Double

Ext Triple

How will I be assessed?

All of the units studied will be internally assessed. There are no external examinations. All assessment for BTEC First qualifications is criterion referenced, based on the achievement of all the specified learning outcomes.

Each unit within the qualification has specified assessment and grading criteria which are to be used for grading purposes. A summative unit grade can be awarded at pass, merit or distinction:

To achieve a ‘pass’ a learner must have satisfied all the pass criteria

To achieve a ‘merit’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the merit criteria

To achieve a ‘distinction’ a learner must additionally have satisfied all the distinction criteria.

A grading scale of pass, merit and distinction is applied to all units.

During the course you will undertake a variety of different assessment methods, these could include; practical work alongside witness statements, written reports, presentations, designing different publications such as posters, leaflets or booklets.

When an assignment is set you will receive an assignment brief.

What could I do next?

You will have gained enough knowledge of the sports industry to seek employment in this area.

You can progress to further education and complete a HND or degree in a sport related topic