Sixth Form Curriculum

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed throughout the course on a unit by unit basis. Written work and practicals make up the assessment.

What will I study?

Students study a range of skills, knowledge and understanding needed to care for and work with a range of animals. Units taught include: Understand the Principles of Animal Biology, Understand Animal Handling and Safe Working, Understand and promote Animal Health, Manage Animal Accommodation, Plan and Monitor Animal Feeding.

Horse Management is also an option studying: Understand the Principles of Horse Biology, Undertake Routine Stable Duties, Maintain Animal Health and Welfare.

What future pathways are available? Students who study Animal Management Learners could progress to a Foundation Degree in Applied Animal Management or Animal Conservation. Other options include HE courses in Animal Management, Animal Behaviour, Marine Biology, Veterinary Nursing, Ecology and Conservation or Zoology. Possible employment opportunities include jobs at a supervisory level in animal sanctuaries, breeding and boarding facilities, specialist pet stores, veterinary practices, zoos or wildlife parks. Another area could be setting up their own businesses, such as dog walking, or grooming businesses.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in GCSE English Language. To study Horse Management you will need to have your own horse.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 2 examinations which account for 100% of the qualification. Students also have the opportunity to gain a practical endorsement to sit alongside their A-Level qualification through the completion of a series of 12 practical assessments and write-ups.

What will I study?

Students study a range of topics including: biochemistry, defence against disease, evolution and exchange systems in plants and animals in their first year. In their second year of study students will cover: genetics, excretion, respiration, photosynthesis and populations/sustainability.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Biology can continue to study Biology at university although this subject supports any science/maths led course ranging from teaching, medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, pharmacy, nursing (midwifery) and research science to name just a few!

 What are the entry requirements?

A grade B or above in GCSE science and a good pass in mathematics.

How will I be assessed?

Throughout this course students will be assessed over a 2 year period.  The course is made up of different coursework assignments, through a variety of tasks including; presentations, reports, site visits and project based work.  There will be no external examinations throughout this qualification, as all coursework will be marked and moderated at Pass, Merit or Distinction level.

What will I study?

Students have the opportunity to study a range of different topics during the course including; marketing, business ownership, finance, recruitment & selection and events management.   Students will develop many skills that will assist them throughout all of the topics covered.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Business Studies can progress on to an undergraduate degree level course at university in a variety of Business options.  Through the variety of topics covered students can then opt for a specialist degree at university based on theirs strongest units.  Students can also develop their own business ideas and use the knowledge and skills they have gathered to assist them.  There are many opportunities for students to gain apprenticeships in the business world in areas such as business finance and administration.

What are the entry requirements?

5 GCSEs including solid passes in English and Mathematics.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed using the BTEC criteria for each unit of work.  Pupils have to complete a set number of units to a pass, merit or distinction in order to achieve the whole qualification.  This qualification is equivalent to an A level and requires pupils to study all 6 units. 

What will I study?

Student study a range of units that closely relate to the gaming industry looking in depth at what goes on behind the scenes.  Students will study units such as Pre production techniques, Communication skills within the industry, project planning, graphic design for a game and principles of game design. 

 What future pathways are available?

Students who study this qualification can go onto continue to study at University, Computer design, Graphics design, Animation and Game marketing.  

What are the entry requirements?

5 A*- C GCSE including a solid pass in English and Mathematics. 

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed on physical skills and performance skills through different stylistic qualities both in studio practice and live performances. Students are also marked on their commitment to the course with the majority of final assessments taking place during the school dance show in April.

What will I study?

The sixth form dance course is a BTEC level 3 120 credit diploma in dance. Students study 12 different units across two years in which they create, perform and appreciate a variety of dance styles for camera and for live performances.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Dance can continue to study at university, which can then lead into a variety careers such as Artistic Director, Choreographer, Community Dance Practitioner, Costume/Set Designer, Dance Performer, Dance/Arts Officer, Dance Education Specialist, Dance Film Maker, Dance Movement Therapist, Dance Journalist, Dance Lecturer or Academic Researcher, Dance Photographer, Dance Project Coordinator or Administrator, Dance Producer, Dance Teacher, Dance Wear Distributor, Lighting Designer/Technical, Production Management, Specialist Notation/Choreology, Pilates Instructor, Press and Public Relations, Rehearsal Director, Specialist, Studio Manager, Yoga Instructor, Youth Worker, Zumba or Gym Instructor.

What are the entry requirements?

A level 5 in GCSE English Language and Maths. Desired – Grade C in GCSE Dance, or Merit in BTEC Level 2 dance.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed internally by teachers at school as well external examiners who will come in and watch your perform.

What will I study?

Component 1: Devising

  • You will create your own performance
  • You will create a portfolio that details the decisions you have made throughout the process of devising your own performance

Component 2: Text in Performance

  • You will perform an extract from a play in a group
  • You will perform a monologue

Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice

  • You will write about a live theatre performance you have seen
  • You will answer questions on August Wilson’s ‘Fences’
  • You will answer questions on ‘Hedda Gabler’ by Henrik Ibsen
What future pathways are available?

Careers: The ARTS and CREATIVE sector employed over 1.71 million people in 2014 . . . this is a huge amount of people!

Drama offers skills that employers have recognised as being crucial in a variety of job roles such as: Front of House e.g. box office, ushers, runner, lighting and sound technicians and designer, script writer, arts consultant, director, game designer (fastest developing industry), set designer, TV editor, TV presenter, make-up artist, costume designer, actor, producer, cinematographer, theatre company artist, radio broadcaster and producer, drama therapist.

What are the entry requirements?

Grade 5 or above English Language and Literature, and grade C or above in GCSE Drama.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 2 examinations which account for 80% of the qualification and a 20% coursework unit based on a language study of the student’s own chosing.

What will I study?

Students study a range of linguistic methods, topical issues such as gender, technology, power, how language changes over time and how children acquire language.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study English Language can continue to study English at university although the subject supports any language, social science, humanities or essay based writing area. Careers that study of English Language supports are social work, teaching, journalism or any occupation that involves analytical skills.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in GCSE English Language.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through an examination which accounts for 40% of the qualification and a 60% coursework unit based on a personal investigation study of the student’s own choosing.

Preparatory period followed by 15 hours of supervised time

96 marks, 40% of GCSE

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set by AQA; marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit.

What will I study?

Component 1:
A portfolio that in total shows explicit coverage of the four assessment objectives. It must include a sustained project evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further work undertaken during the student’s course of study.

96 marks, 60% of GCE

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set and marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit. Moderation will normally take place in June.

Component 2:
Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives. This extended creative response must explicitly evidence students’ ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skill and  understanding from an initial selected starting point through to their realisation of intentions in the 15 hours of supervised time.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Fine Art can continue to study Art at university. An example of just some of the careers within the Art & Design industry are Artists, Designers, Web Design, Gallery Curator, Art Educator, Teacher.

What are the entry requirements?

Grade B in GCSE Art.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 2 written examinations and 1 speaking examination. Paper 1 is worth 50% and tests students’ listening, reading and writing skills. In Paper 2, worth 20%, students must write two essays based on a film and literature study. The oral examination is worth 30% and students must deliver a presentation in the target language and then discuss one of the key themes.

What will I study?

The A level course builds on the skills that students will have acquired during the GCSE course, but focuses much more on the grammatical aspect of learning a language, and the first half term will focus purely on grammar. Students then study a range of topics taken from the two themes: Social issues and Trends and Political and Artistic culture. Alongside this students undertake the study of a French film and a book in the target language. The aim of the course is to develop students’ cultural knowledge of France and other French-speaking countries, in addition to their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary.

What future pathways are available?

Having a language qualification really does open so many doors to a range of job opportunities. Students who study French can continue to read French and other languages at University and this would include spending a year living abroad. Learning a language enables students to develop key employable skills, such as team work, communication and creativity, and there are a host of careers for students with a language qualification, including translation and interpretation, teaching, international law, travel and tourism.

What are the entry requirements?

At least grade B in French GCSE and English GCSE.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 3 examinations which account for 80% of the qualification and a 20% for an independent investigation based on a question or issue of the student’s own choosing.

What will I study?

Students study a range of physical and human topics, such as tectonic processes and hazards, coastal landscapes, the water cycle and water insecurity, globalisation, diverse places and a synoptic unit based on a chosen theme.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Geography can continue to study Geography at university although the subject supports any language, social science, humanities or essay based writing area. Careers that study of Geography supports are town planner, armed forces, architect, teaching and surveyor.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in GCSE Geography.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed throughout the 2 year course by completing continuous assessments in the form of coursework tasks. The tasks will include site visits, reports, project based work, practical tasks and interactive presentations.  

Results are offered to students in the form of Pass Merit or distinction and are delivered during class time with practical demonstrations.

There will be no external examinations throughout this qualification.

What will I study?

As a student you will have the exciting opportunity to study a wide range of ICT topics throughout the 2 years. These topics will include PC building and networking as well as animation, website design and investigating graphic designs.

What future pathways are available?

You can explore such avenues as web development and creation becoming a web designer. You may like to use your experience of PC building and networking as an IT technician.

We have seen a large number of students take up either ICT apprenticeships or move onto University to study ICT.

What are the entry requirements?

5 GCSEs including solid passes in English and mathematics.

How will I be assessed?

Students will be required to complete 6 units to achieve the BTEC Subsidiary Diploma equivalent to 1 A-Level.  Of the 6 units 3 are core units and the additional 3 are optional units. All units are internally assessed by coursework.

What will I study?

Throughout the 2 years you will study a variety of topics including the distinction between criminal and civil laws including Police powers and a focus on the structure and workings of the court system. In addition as part of the core units studied you will learn how laws are made both by Parliament and case law. You will also get to grips with the different homicide offences including murder and manslaughter. Other topics that you will get to study include family law considering the law on divorce and separation with its related impact on the family, particularly children. Finally you will look at the Tort of Negligence considering the principle of duty of care towards others.

You will study these topics in a variety of ways including group work, research, presentations, and role play. Furthermore you will get some real life experiences by visiting local courts and law firms as well as hearing from guest speakers including local barristers, solicitors and magistrates.

What future pathways are available?

There are lots of opportunities available for exciting careers in and around the law.  This can include a career as a barrister or solicitor with future opportunities to progress in your career to become a judge and make laws yourself! A qualification in Applied Law will also prepare you for a career in the Police force, social work, teaching or lecturing.  Furthermore, due to the research, presentation and analytical skills developed during the course you will gain essential skills for careers outside the Law.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass (Grade B) in GCSE English due to the analytical skills required.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed over 7 units. Three mandatory units and 4 chosen from a selection. The units include the many attributes required to be a successful musician, performer and/or composer.

What will I study?

You will study three mandatory courses looking at everything from preparing for an audition to rehearsing and performing. The course also looks at individual development on an instrument, working within a ensemble and managing your own concert, to name but a few options available.

What future pathways are available?

Obviously, job in the music sector from performer to studio engineer and song writer are accessible from this course. But the key skills of confidence, communication, research and development and self-motivation and time management are key skills which are transferrable and respected in all career pathways.

What are the entry requirements?

Previous study at GCSE would be an advantage, though not essential. Ability to play a chosen instrument/voice at least grade 4/5 is required. Due to the written element of the course good research and English skills are required.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 3 examinations which account for 100% of the qualification based on philosophical issues, ethical theories and dilemmas and a study of a world tradition.

What will I study?

Students study a range of philosophical arguments, such as the ontological argument and the problem of evil, ethical theories and dilemmas, such as utilitarianism and sexual ethics, and the beliefs, sources of authority and identity of a world tradition.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Philosophy and Ethics can continue to study Philosophy, Ethics or Religious Studies at university although the subject supports any social science, humanities, law or essay based writing area. Careers that study of Philosophy, Ethics and Religious Studies supports are law, teaching, journalism, business or any occupation that involves analytical skills.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in GCSE English Language. There is no requirement to have studied Religious Studies GCSE.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through an examination which accounts for 40% of the qualification and a 60% coursework unit based on a personal investigation study of the student’s own choosing.

Preparatory period followed by 15 hours of supervised time

96 marks, 40% of GCSE

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set by AQA; marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit.

What will I study?

Component 1:
A portfolio that in total shows explicit coverage of the four assessment objectives. It must include a sustained project evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further work undertaken during the student’s course of study.

96 marks, 60% of GCE

Non-exam assessment (NEA) set and marked by the school/college and moderated by AQA during a visit. Moderation will normally take place in June.

Component 2:
Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives. This extended creative response must explicitly evidence students’ ability to draw together different areas of knowledge, skill and  understanding from an initial selected starting point through to their realisation of intentions in the 15 hours of supervised time.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Photography can continue to study Photography at university. An example of just some of the careers within the Art & Design industry are Photo Journalism, Fashion Photographers, Filmmaker, Designers, Web Design, Gallery Curator, Art Educator, Teacher.

What are the entry requirements?

Grade B in GCSE in an Art based qualification.

How will I be assessed?

There are three exams at the end of the two years for A-level Physics , all of which are two hours long. At least 15% of the marks for A-level Physics are based on what you learned in your practical work.

The practical skills element will also be assessed throughout the two years and the outcome of this will be reported separately to your examination grade.

What will I study?

As you progress through the course, you will build on your knowledge of the laws of physics, applying your understanding to areas ranging from sub-atomic particles to the entire universe and covering topics such as; particle physics & radiation, waves, mechanics, electricity, fields and nuclear physics. You may also opt to choose, for example, astrophysics from a range of 5 options choices.

You will quickly acquire the skills to think independently and creatively in a challenging scientific environment.

What future pathways are available?

Physics has one of the highest currency values of any A-level. It commands universal respect among universities and employers.

This qualification is invaluable for entry to higher education courses in Engineering, Physical Sciences and Medical Physics, and it is highly desirable for Computing and Architecture. Find out more about careers and further study opportunities at physics.org

Students studying Physics leads to a wide variety of rewarding careers, including roles such as Geophysicist/ field seismologist, Healthcare scientist, medical physics, Higher education lecturer, Radiation protection practitioner, Research scientist (physical sciences), Scientific laboratory technician, Secondary school teacher, Meteorologist, Structural engineer, Acoustic engineer, Product/process development scientist, Systems developer, Technical author.

While learning about how the universe works, you’ll gain skills that all employers value – an ability to grasp concepts quickly and a determination to search for answers, not to mention problem-solving, analytical, mathematical and practical skills. Studying Physics is therefore an excellent way of keeping your options open and finding a career where you can earn a good salary.

What are the entry requirements?

At least a grade B (grade 7) in GCSE Physics or Double/Combined Science and at least a grade B (grade 7) in Mathematics.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the second year through three examinations which account for 100% of the qualification. During the course students are also assessed internally and will complete practical projects to ensure full preparation for the A-Level exams.

What will I study?

Students study a range of topics including memory, attachment, social influence, psychopathology, research methods, approaches in psychology, schizophrenia, forensic psychology, relationships, issues and debates.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Psychology can continue their studies at degree level leading to many different career paths ranging from a Psychologist, Teacher, Child Care Practitioner, NHS worker, Police Officer and Marketing and Law based work. Psychology also supports progress onto many other degree courses and jobs.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in both GCSE English and Maths.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the second year through three examinations which account for 100% of the qualification. During the course students are also assessed internally and will complete practical projects to ensure full preparation for the A-Level exams.

What will I study?

Students study a range of topics including education, families and households, beliefs in society, crime and deviance and sociological theories and methods.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Sociology can continue their studies at degree level leading to many different career paths ranging from Journalism, the Legal Profession, Social Work, Teaching, Nursing, Marketing, Public Relations, Social Research, Civil Service, Market Research, the Police and even Politics. Sociology also supports progress onto many other degree courses and jobs.

What are the entry requirements?

A good pass in both GCSE English and Maths.

How will I be assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of the 2 years through 2 written examinations and 1 speaking examination. Paper 1 is worth 50% and tests students’ listening, reading and writing skills. In Paper 2, worth 20%, students must write two essays based on a film and literature study. The oral examination is worth 30% and students must deliver a presentation in the target language and then discuss one of the key themes.

What will I study?

The A level course builds on the skills that students will have acquired during the GCSE course, but focuses much more on the grammatical aspect of learning a language, and the first half term will focus purely on grammar. Students then study a range of topics taken from the two themes: Social issues and Trends and Political and Artistic culture. Alongside this students undertake a study of a Spanish/Latin American film and a book in the target language.  The aim of the course is to develop students’ cultural knowledge of Spain and Latin America, in addition to their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary.

What future pathways are available?

Having a language qualification really does open so many doors to a range of job opportunities. Students who study Spanish can continue to read Spanish and other languages at University and this would include spending a year living abroad. Learning a language enables students to develop key employable skills, such as team work, communication and creativity and there are a host of careers for students with a language qualification, including translation and interpretation, teaching, international law, travel and tourism.

What are the entry requirements?

At least grade B in Spanish GCSE and English GCSE.

How will I be assessed?

Students will be assessed through coursework throughout the 2 years which accounts for 100% of the qualification. There is no external examination at present.

What will I study?

Students study a range of units over the 2 years. The curriculum looks at Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport, Sport Nutrition, Practical Team and Individual Sports. Also an emphasis is on Sports Coaching and issues around leading a successful sports session and events.

What future pathways are available?

Students who study Sport will gain knowledge of the sports industry to seek employment.

Students will also be able to continue to study at university in a sports related topics such as:

  • BA (Hons) in Sports Development and Management
  • BSc (Hons) in Sports Management
  • BSc (Hons) Sports Business Management
  • BSc (Hons) Sport and Leisure Management
  • BSc (Hons) Sports Science (Outdoor Activities)
  • BSc (Hons) in Exercise, Health and Fitness
  • BSc (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Psychology.
What are the entry requirements?

To gain entry onto the course students will need to achieve 5 GCSES including English and Maths.